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_Eternal Kiss of Darkness_, Jeaniene Frost (kindle)

This is another series supernatural. Jeaniene Frost's main series involves a vampire named Cat and nicknamed Kitten (it's amazing what a cliche this is) and her Twoo Wuv, Bones. It is violent. It has amazingly graphic sex. It has been successful enough for Frost to spin off a series of books set in the same universe, and in which Cat and Bones make appearances (sometimes significant), but which are single book romances involving secondary characters from the main series.

This entry introduces Kira, a private investigator who wanted to be a cop. That didn't work out for her, because she was married to a dirty cop and turned him in. One night, as she's walking home in Chicago's Loop, she hears a scary ruckus and calls 911 on her phone. The response by the operator does not inspire her confidence, so she pokes her nose in and discovers a small number of ghouls (she doesn't know this) trying to kill a master vampire (ditto). The vampire thinks he is feeling like he's sick of being undead and hoping the ghouls will kill him. Instead, he feels bad that a human who has no idea who he is is about to die horribly doing him a (dubious) favor. He rescues her, heals her of a mortal wound, kills the ghouls and decamps to his current residence.

He cannot, however, greeneye her into forgetting the whole thing. And he's not sure why. He thinks maybe if he lets a little time go by, and for his blood in her to weaken, etc., it'll work. He's wrong.

Kira's sister Tina has cystic fibrosis and has a bad spell that lands her in the hospital. Mencheres (the master vampire) takes Kira to visit her and gets her sister back to her baseline level of health. He also gives Kira a bag of vials of his blood so Tina can live a normal lifetime. Then he figures he'll go find a way to commit suicide.

Mencheres is familiar to readers of the main series as the slightly creepy and very angsty Pharaoh with the visions and knowledge of black magic. He used to have a _really_ creepy wife, Patra, but she's dead now. This means Mencheres can, in theory, get laid. Kira figures that Mencheres leaving her with all the blood and trusting her to keep her mouth shut about vampires and so forth is a sign that he loves her, and decides to try to track him down. She pulls all the cases in her agencies files that have a supernatural element, however wacky, and more or less reopens them. They doesn't find her Mencheres directly, but does find some other vampires, who do unpleasant things to her in an effort to find out who sent her. This brings Mencheres back into her life, as well as Mencheres uncle and old enemy, Ratjedef. What with one thing and another, Kira is killed, brought back as a vampire, survives the blood lust. Ratjedef frames Mencheres et al for arson destroying the club and the other vampires and exposing the existence of vampires etc. This brings the Law Guardians in; antics ensue.

Did I mention Disneyland? No? Well, that'll be some incentive to read this.

Frost's vampires have a _lot_ of power: humans do not do well in this world. Thus, her human heroines tend to wind up converting to one supernatural form or another before the book is over, so they can their their beastly lover's world. I kind of liked that in this outing, there was such an emphasis on Kira being able to maintain her relationship with her sister, and planning to continue her human career and so forth. It didn't quite work out that way (sister, yes; career, no -- but she gets to be a vampire cop, instead, so that's okay), but it definitely helps with the creepy becoming-a-supe-is-like-joining-a-cult factor.

Should you read this? Only if you're already reading Frost.
Tags: book review, paranormal fiction
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