walkitout (walkitout) wrote,
walkitout
walkitout

blogs about publishing

I haven't been blogging the surfing as I go, because I can't get any kind of handle on what I'm reading. However, I have no hit something so bizarre and so inexplicable that I'm willing to just take a whack at it and see if someone (maybe H.?) can explain it.

http://www.publishingtrends.com/2010/05/now-in-hardcover-the-series-in-2010/

This May blog post starts out by pointing out something very obvious: hey, the kiddies these days, they by the series books. In large flocks.

Then they back it up a bit to mention Baby-Sitters Club and Sweet Valley High, where the first weird bit shows up.

"The publication of the BSC prequel and the announcement of a St. Martin’s Sweet Valley book for adults created excitement among twenty-something bloggers who read the books as kids"

Er. Those two series started when I was in high school. I'm not in my 20s. I'm not even in my 30s anymore. Some of those bloggers might be older than you realize.

All right, whatever. La la la la la. Stuff about hardcover sales. Stuff about Maximum Ride. Blah blah bleeping blah. The obligatory Harry Potter changed everything. Yeah, yeah. YA paranormal and/or dystopian. Okay.

"So what about creating series for adults themselves?"

It was at this point that my world tilted and I experienced some nausea. Regular readers of my blog are aware that I followed Sherrilyn Kenyon until _Acheron_ (okay, I bailed on the dreamwtf ancillary books earlier) and I followed Jim Butcher until dad killed mom in front of daughter to effect genocide (_Changes_). I forget precisely why I gave up on Rachel Caine's weather/genii thing. I don't care what the plot rationale is. That shit isn't right. I'm still reading: Kitty the Werewolf by Carrie Vaughn (book 8 awaits on my kindle), Rachel Morgan of The Hollows (book 8 read and awaiting book 9), Honor Harrington (12 in the main line and another 8 ancillary), Kris Longknife (awaiting book 8 in October), Terry Pratchett's Discworld (I think it's over 3 dozen, but I haven't read _Unseen Academicals_ yet), the 6 books in the Lost Fleet and the 4 books in JAG in Space by Hemry/Campbell, most if not all of Harris' Shakespeare/Lily Bard series (uncertain about book 5), 10 Sookie Stackhouse books (I haven't read _Touch of Dead_ altho I own it). I haven't bought the latest from Moira Moore, because apparently book 5 ends on as much a cliffhanger as book 4 and I won't put up with that. I'll wait and see if matters improve instead. Where was I now... Oh, Jeaniene Frost's books, 1st in the new series, 4 in the series about Cat and Bones.

You know, I'm bored already. I haven't even mentioned Kresley Cole (altho I'm developing some real issues there), or Kelley Armstrong. Further, I haven't mentioned any of the old and complete science fiction series that I still periodically reread.

When a publisher says, hey, series for adults? Whadaya think? I go, what planet are you on.

Berkower of Writers' House shows some awareness that there are adult series out there, and apparently she reads Moning (which looks way too LKH for my tastes. I read a lot of LKH, too. Looks like I made it 10 books into the mess that was Anita Blake, and read one of the other series.). But the only other adults series mentioned is something (I could not possibly make this up) inspired by Thomas Kinkade paintings. They are 11 books in and spinning off an ancillary series.

Really? And I thought _I_ was reading trashy fiction. Clearly, I had no idea just how deep into the dark some people are prepared to go.

Berkower then adds: "I wonder if there’s a little bit of stigma attached to doing series which the kids’ market has overcome and the adult market might look at seriously.”

Judging from what I'm seeing elsewhere in publisher-centric blogs about books, that stigma is solely on the part of the publishers.

Do these people actually read? You know, a lot of the later series entries book make it onto the NYT bestseller lists. No one pointing at a series based on _Thomas Kinkade_ paintings has a leg to stand on in terms of taste or redeeming social value, in terms of arguments against publishing this stuff.
Tags: publishing
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