walkitout (walkitout) wrote,
walkitout
walkitout

and he thinks green ginger must have been candied or crystallized

Rather than meaning what it clearly means, because _he_ can't figure out how it got to Europe doesn't mean it couldn't be done. R. and I are currently arguing about possible routes. He seems worried about freezing on a water route south of the Cape of Good Hope and wonders what would happen if you took it across a desert. Me, I'm not so concerned; those people were clever, and there was a lot of money riding on it.

ETA: According to this source:

http://www.gallowglass.org/jadwiga/herbs/Easternspice.html

People were sprouting it by the end of the 16th century.

BUT this is a 1542 recipe for making candied ginger called green ginger:

http://www.florilegium.org/files/FOOD-SWEETS/Cndied-Ginger-art.rtf

Who the f* knows. Probably context dependent.

ETAYA: By 1845, definitively after our period, green ginger is the first ingredient in making candied ginger:

http://www.theoldfoodie.com/2006/04/lord-mayors-easter.html
Tags: food, geekitude, not-a-book-review
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