walkitout (walkitout) wrote,
walkitout
walkitout

a bit more about Haig/_Dead Father's Club_, musings on Peak Oil, Farm Town addiction

First, and least important, if anyone else is totally addicted to Farm Town on facebook, I could sure use some more neighbors, as could another friend of mine. If you aren't addicted to Farm Town, and don't want to get sucked into yet another tamagotchi style game, forget I mentioned it.

Second, the group had a mixed reaction to _Dead Father's Club_, varying from just flat out not liking it, to not liking it but kind of liking the insight into the kid's head and/or not believing the POV (for a kid that inarticulate, that was a lot of detailed insight), to enjoying it as a story without awareness of the Hamlet connection. I don't know that anyone will run right out and read more of Haig's revisiting of Shakespeare.

Third, since I ran out of older posts on Henry Cutler's excellent blog about building cargo bikes and so forth, I thought I'd go digging around to see what the Peak Oilers were saying these days. I used to follow that trend pretty hard, but the recession really took the wind out of the supply-crisis-sails (if, indeed, there was a supply crisis and not a big speculative run up. I'm not able to tell, altho I was certainly convinced at the time there was a supply crisis), A. was born and I got very distracted with more important and more interesting things (or at least, they seemed brighter and shinier at the time). Reading about cargo bikes, bakfiets, etc., got me to thinking that if these suckers were so infinitely appealing to me _without_ an energy crisis/gas price spike, what did the PO folk have to say on the subject? For that matter, I got to wondering what the PO folk had to say about bicycles in general. I knew they'd always been a little mysteriously anti-city.

First stop was peakoil.com (importantly distinct from peakoil.net, which is the ASPO site). I was a little surprised that there was a quiz in the corner about what kind of PO'er you are, with Doomer being a choice. Whoa. Like, self-awareness? What happened?

Next stop, after dipping into the usual news tidbits and confirming that bicycles just weren't getting a lot of play, and to the extent they were, they were being mocked for not solving the kid and/or cargo transport problem (clearly, two trends that hadn't met up yet), was peakoildebunked, a blog that went onto hiatus more or less as soon as I found it. But it had been around for a number of years, so there's so choice material in the posts and the comments threads. Somewhere along the line, the "denier" in chief over there came out explicitly saying he believed oil was finite and would eventually run out. A certain number of (sensible) people in the comments felt he should have retitled the blog dieoffdebunked, but that wouldn't fully capture what he was up to. He has post after glorious post on electric vehicles of all kinds: scooters, cars, trucks, cargo-handlers. He has post after glorious post on how you can make fertilizer (and just about anything else) without oil. He's also a big ole fan of the nukes, which I find annoying, but he uses the C word! Constantly! It's refreshing to read someone talk about conservation strategies both as a transition if we hit a wall (which with the high prices there for a bit, we really did) and as a long-term strategy, a la Japan and the EU. He debunks the abuse of Jevon's Law (the claim that increasing efficiency just leads to higher use, without addressing price issues).

One of the weirder things I've encountered was the conversations I had a year ago in Seattle in May with a series of friends. Everyone said, no, they hadn't really made any changes in response to expensive gas, but then launched into detailed descriptions of commute changes and trip consolidation and other stuff. I think that conservation is like sex for most people: harder to talk about than to actually engage in.
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